đź’– 7 Ways to Love Your Heart đź’–

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February is American Heart month. There are small changes that we can make that will significantly improve our heart health. Heart disease is the number one killer of men and women in the US. Show your heart some love and start today!

Check out the 7 Key Changes to a Healthy Heart:

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Not Sure where to start? It’s always a great idea to get a physical with your general practitioner. Know you numbers so you know where to start! The most important numbers to know for whole body health are blood pressure, blood sugar, cholesterol, and BMI (Body Mass Index). This is will give you a base line on what areas you need to focus on in order to improve your numbers.

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Every year after you should check in with your doctor so you can compare your current results. Many patients do not experience any symptoms with high blood pressure, blood sugar or cholesterol.  When this is caught early, it it easier to manage and could possibly keep you from having a heart attack. It’s never too late to start!

 

 

Don’t Forget to Go Red on February 1st !!

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, taking more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Someone you know and love may be affected – at any age. Heart disease and stroke claim the lives of 1 in 3 women – a third of our mothers, sisters and friends. It’s time to change this fact.

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Nearly 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented through education and lifestyle changes, cardiovascular diseases continue to be a woman’s greatest health threat. To treat, beat and prevent heart disease and stroke, women should understand family health history, know their five key personal health numbers to help determine risk and make healthy behavior changes like moving more, eating smart and managing blood pressure.

That’s why the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women movement, nationally sponsored by CVS Health, and encourages you to show your support by wearing red and giving on Friday, February 1 to help raise awareness and save lives from heart disease.

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Here’s how you can join us in support of women’s health:

• Wear red to raise awareness about heart disease – the leading cause of death in women. You can get the iconic Red Dress Pin at ShopHeart.org.

• Make a donation to support the lifesaving work of the American Heart Association at WearRedDay.org or at your local CVS Pharmacy, February 3- 23.

• Take action for your heart health. To help women better understand their risk for heart disease, CVS Health is offering no cost heart health screenings every Thursday in February, including Valentine’s Day, at CVS Minute Clinics nationwide.

• Join the conversation by using #WearRedDay, #WearRedAndGive, #WearRedDaySC or your local Go Red hashtag on social media.

Get involved and make a difference.  The battle won’t be won unless more women just like you are willing to join together to defeat the No. 1 killer of women. Go Red For Women has all kinds of ways to get involved and use your talents. By doing nothing, you give heart disease a huge advantage.

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Visit for more information on how you can get involved :

https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/get-involved

https://kiow.com/2019/01/31/national-wear-go-red-for-women-day-is-friday/

https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/get-involved

 

 

World Heart Day!

♥️🌎 World Heart Day is celebrated every year on 9/29. This year we’re asking people around the world to make a promise … for my heart, for your heart, for all our hearts! ♥️ 🌎

A promise as an individual to cook and eat more healthily, to do more exercise and encourage your children to be more active, to say no to smoking and help your loved ones to stop. A promise as a healthcare professional to save more lives. A promise as a politician to implement an NCD action plan.

A simple promise… for MY HEART, for YOUR HEART, for ALL OUR HEARTS.

Cardiovascular disease is the world’s number one killer today. But it doesn’t need to be this way. By making just a few small changes to our lives, we can reduce our risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as improving our quality of life and setting a good example for the next generation. It’s about saying to yourself, the people you care about and individuals all around the world, “what can I do right now to look after MY HEART… and YOUR HEART?”

In May 2012, world leaders committed to reducing global mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is accountable for nearly half of all NCD deaths making it the world’s number one killer. World Heart Day is, therefore, the perfect platform for the CVD community to unite in the fight against CVD and reduce the global disease burden.

World Heart Day is a global campaign during which individuals, families, communities and governments around the world participate in activities to take charge of their heart health and that of others. Through this campaign, the World Heart Federation unites people from all countries and backgrounds in the fight against the CVD burden, and inspires and drives international action to encourage heart-healthy living across the world.

For more info : World heart day

World Heart Federation

Man sees big results by following the federal diet and exercise guidelines for a year

This is a great story by Daniel Green on how he committed to following all of the federal diet and exercise guidelines for one year and saw measurable results in multiple areas of his life. I love the comprehensive approach that he took and how he was able to incorporate everything into his daily routine so that diet and exercise didn’t become a chore.

Most importantly, I’ve finally learned how to live a truly healthy life in a way that suits the rest of my lifestyle. Physical activity and better nutrition are no longer vague notions that I have to figure out how to make time for, but instead are normal parts of my daily routine.

Read the full story here

Nutrition Labels

Exited about the upcoming changes to nutrition labels:

On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the White House announced final changes to nutrition labels, which will be required on packaged foods within the next two years. The long-awaited changes included a specific call-out for added sugars—sweeteners added to foods, as opposed to those that occur naturally, as in a piece of fruit—a larger font for the total number of calories, and serving sizes that are more in line with the amount of food a person is likely to consume. For instance, a 20 oz soda will now count as one serving, since that is how it is most likely to be consumed.

Check out this article on time.com for a great overview or head over to the FDA’s official page for some serious details.