How to Save a Choking Baby

Why are babies vulnerable to choking?

Choking is a common cause of injury and death in young children, primarily because their small airways are easily obstructed. It takes time for babies to master the ability to chew and swallow food, and babies might not be able to cough forcefully enough to dislodge an airway obstruction. As babies explore their environments, they also commonly put objects into their mouths — which can lead to infant choking.

Sometimes health conditions increase the risk of choking as well. Children who have swallowing disorders, neuromuscular disorders, developmental delays and traumatic brain injury, for example, have a higher risk of choking than do other children.

What are the most common causes of infant choking?

Food is the most common cause of infant choking. However, small objects, parts from toys and certain types of behavior during eating — such as eating while distracted — also can cause infant choking.

What can I do to prevent infant choking?

To prevent infant choking:

  • Properly time the introduction of solid foods. Introducing your baby to solid foods before he or she has the motor skills to swallow them can lead to infant choking. Wait until your baby is at least 4 months old to introduce pureed solid foods.
  • Don’t offer high-risk foods. Don’t give babies or young children hot dogs, chunks of meat or cheese, grapes, raw vegetables, or fruit chunks, unless they’re cut up into small pieces. Don’t give babies or young children hard foods, such as seeds, nuts, popcorn and hard candy that can’t be changed to make them safe options. Other high-risk foods include peanut butter, marshmallows and chewing gum.
  • Supervise mealtime. As your child gets older, don’t allow him or her to play, walk or run while eating. Remind your child to chew and swallow his or her food before talking. Don’t allow your child to throw food in the air and catch it in his or her mouth or stuff large amounts of food in his or her mouth.
  • Carefully evaluate your child’s toys. Don’t allow your baby or toddler to play with latex balloons — which pose a hazard when uninflated and broken — small balls, marbles, toys that contain small parts or toys meant for older children. Look for age guidelines when buying toys and regularly examine toys to make sure they’re in good condition.
  • Keep hazardous objects out of reach. Common household items that might pose a choking hazard include coins, button batteries, dice and pen caps.

WHAT TO DO IF BABY CHOKES

Before you even get to this worst-case scenario, the smartest thing you can do is take a class on baby choking and infant CPR. “In the heat of the moment, it’s hard to know how to do it correctly,” Shook says. “Although 911 can walk you through it, if you’ve never done it, it’s very difficult.” Find a class near you and get certified! Nine Lives CPR offers many class options to fit your needs.

How to Relieve Choking on an Infant (1 year or less) :

 

For more information :

https://www.thebump.com/a/what-to-do-when-baby-is-choking?fbclid=IwAR0Se3qYfMD3Zfa4UANwB_BSE-z9fc54Kk3jaWfs84ANWCTatOQIWeSMyoo

https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/infant-and-toddler-health/in-depth/infant-choking/art-20044661

 

 

Don’t Forget to Go Red on February 1st !!

Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women, taking more lives than all forms of cancer combined. Someone you know and love may be affected – at any age. Heart disease and stroke claim the lives of 1 in 3 women – a third of our mothers, sisters and friends. It’s time to change this fact.

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Nearly 80 percent of cardiac events can be prevented through education and lifestyle changes, cardiovascular diseases continue to be a woman’s greatest health threat. To treat, beat and prevent heart disease and stroke, women should understand family health history, know their five key personal health numbers to help determine risk and make healthy behavior changes like moving more, eating smart and managing blood pressure.

That’s why the American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women movement, nationally sponsored by CVS Health, and encourages you to show your support by wearing red and giving on Friday, February 1 to help raise awareness and save lives from heart disease.

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Here’s how you can join us in support of women’s health:

• Wear red to raise awareness about heart disease – the leading cause of death in women. You can get the iconic Red Dress Pin at ShopHeart.org.

• Make a donation to support the lifesaving work of the American Heart Association at WearRedDay.org or at your local CVS Pharmacy, February 3- 23.

• Take action for your heart health. To help women better understand their risk for heart disease, CVS Health is offering no cost heart health screenings every Thursday in February, including Valentine’s Day, at CVS Minute Clinics nationwide.

• Join the conversation by using #WearRedDay, #WearRedAndGive, #WearRedDaySC or your local Go Red hashtag on social media.

Get involved and make a difference.  The battle won’t be won unless more women just like you are willing to join together to defeat the No. 1 killer of women. Go Red For Women has all kinds of ways to get involved and use your talents. By doing nothing, you give heart disease a huge advantage.

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Visit for more information on how you can get involved :

https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/get-involved

https://kiow.com/2019/01/31/national-wear-go-red-for-women-day-is-friday/

https://www.goredforwomen.org/en/get-involved

 

 

World Heart Day!

♥️🌎 World Heart Day is celebrated every year on 9/29. This year we’re asking people around the world to make a promise … for my heart, for your heart, for all our hearts! ♥️ 🌎

A promise as an individual to cook and eat more healthily, to do more exercise and encourage your children to be more active, to say no to smoking and help your loved ones to stop. A promise as a healthcare professional to save more lives. A promise as a politician to implement an NCD action plan.

A simple promise… for MY HEART, for YOUR HEART, for ALL OUR HEARTS.

Cardiovascular disease is the world’s number one killer today. But it doesn’t need to be this way. By making just a few small changes to our lives, we can reduce our risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as improving our quality of life and setting a good example for the next generation. It’s about saying to yourself, the people you care about and individuals all around the world, “what can I do right now to look after MY HEART… and YOUR HEART?”

In May 2012, world leaders committed to reducing global mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is accountable for nearly half of all NCD deaths making it the world’s number one killer. World Heart Day is, therefore, the perfect platform for the CVD community to unite in the fight against CVD and reduce the global disease burden.

World Heart Day is a global campaign during which individuals, families, communities and governments around the world participate in activities to take charge of their heart health and that of others. Through this campaign, the World Heart Federation unites people from all countries and backgrounds in the fight against the CVD burden, and inspires and drives international action to encourage heart-healthy living across the world.

For more info : World heart day

World Heart Federation

Dental & Medical Office OSHA Compliance Requirements

Did You Know That the Healthcare Sector has More Workplace-related Illnesses & Injuries than Any Other Industry???

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OSHA Requirements for Healthcare Facilities:

 The National Institute of Safety and Health was created in 1970 as a branch of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention to set workplace standards in the health care sector. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was created in 1971 to enforce these standards and protects employees’ rights in workplace settings. Examples of these workplaces are hospitals, dental offices, home health care facilities, birthing facilities and nursing homes.

OSHA requires that all healthcare facilities have annual training for their employees that includes certain standards in the workplace. All new employees should have OSHA training within 30 days of hire. The following requirements include those that normally apply to medical and dental offices, whether there are 2 or 200 employees. The complete text of the regulations can be found in Title 29 of the Code of Federal Regulations (29 CFR). Code of Federal Regulations – Title 29

Bloodborne Pathogens Standard (Infection Control)
(29 
CFR 1910.1030)

Image result for OSHA bloodborne pathogen This is the most frequently requested and referenced OSHA standard affecting medical and dental offices. Many healthcare professionals are required to take an infection control course for license renewals. Nine Lives CPR offers the American Heart Association Bloodborne Pathogen Onsite Course that includes 2 CEs for Dental Professionals. There is also a basic Online Bloodborne Pathogens course available that meets the (29 CFR 1910.1030) standard for infection control.

Some basic requirements of the OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens Standard Course includes:

  • A written exposure control plan, to be updated annually
  • Use of universal precautions
  • Consideration, implementation, and use of safer, engineered needles and sharps
  • Use of engineering and work practice controls and appropriate personal protective equipment (gloves, face and eye protection, gowns)
  • Hepatitis B vaccine provided to exposed employees at no cost
  • Medical follow-up in the event of an “exposure incident”
  • Use of labels or color-coding for items such as sharps disposal boxes and containers for regulated waste, contaminated laundry, and certain specimens.
  • Proper containment of all regulated waste

Many medical and dental offices choose to take their compliance training even further to ensure that their offices are meeting federal regulations. All it takes is one complaint for DHEC to show up and issue a major fine. It also takes only one mistake for an injury to occur and a law suit to follow. So take your annual training to the next level by adding on other OSHA standards to your workplace update.

Nine Lives CPR recommends that your annual OSHA compliance training for healthcare facilities includes Bloodborne Pathogen Training as well as :

Hazard Communication
(29 
CFR 1910.1200)

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The hazard communication standard is sometimes called the “employee right-to-know” standard. It requires employee access to hazard information. The basic requirements include:

  • A written hazard communication program
  • A list of hazardous chemicals (such as alcohol, disinfectants, anesthetic agents, sterilants, mercury) used or stored in the office
  • A copy of the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) for each chemical (obtained from the manufacturer) used or stored in the office
  • Employee training

Ionizing Radiation
(29 
CFR 1910.1096)


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This standard applies to facilities that have an x-ray machine and requires the following:

  • A survey of the types of radiation used in the facility, including x-rays
  • Restricted areas to limit employee exposures
  • Employees working in restricted areas must wear personal radiation monitors such as film badges or pocket dosimeters
  • Rooms and equipment may need to be labeled and equipped with caution signs

Exit Routes
(29 
CFR Subpart E 1910.35, 1910.36, 1910.37, and 1910.38 and 1910.39)

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 These standards include the requirements for providing safe and accessible building exits in case of fire or other emergency. It is important to become familiar with the full text of these standards because they provide details about signage and other issues. OSHA consultation services can help or your insurance company or local fire/police service may be able to assist you. The basic responsibilities include:

  • Exit routes sufficient for the number of employees in any occupied space
  • A diagram of evacuation routes posted in a visible location.

Electrical
(Subpart S-Electrical 29 
CFR 1010.301 to 29 CFR1910.399)

Related image These standards address electrical safety requirements to safeguard employees. OSHA electrical standards apply to electrical equipment and wiring in hazardous locations. If you use flammable gases, you may need special wiring and equipment installation. In addition to reading the full text of the OSHA standard, you should check with your insurance company or local fire department, or request an OSHA consultation for help.

OSHA Poster

 OSHA Poster OSHA Poster

Every workplace must display the OSHA poster (OSHA Publication 3165), or the state plan equivalent. The poster explains worker rights to a safe workplace and how to file a complaint. The poster must be placed where employees will see it. You can download a copy or order one free copy from OSHA’s web site at www.osha.gov or by calling (800) 321-OSHA.

Reporting Occupational Injuries and Illnesses
(29 
CFR 1904)

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 Medical and dental offices are currently exempt from maintaining an official log of reportable injuries and illnesses (OSHA Form 300) under the federal OSHA record keeping rule, although they may be required to maintain records in some state plan states. If you are in a state plan state, contact your state plan directly for more information. All employers, including medical and dental offices, must report any work-related fatality or the hospitalization of three or more employees in a single incident to the nearest OSHA office. Call (800) 321-OSHA or your state plan for assistance.

Roxy RDH, BSDH, MEd

For more information:

OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen Course 2CEs

OSHA Requirements

Healthcare Facilities OSHA

OSHA

Online Bloodborne Pathogens

Technology vs. Heart Disease

HEART DISEASE IS THE MOST COMMON CAUSE OF DEATH WORLDWIDE

Technology to the rescue on the fight against heart disease! Many phones, for example, already have accelerometers that measure physical activity like steps taken, while the Apple Watch and Fitbits use sensors to measure heart rate. Heart irregularities can be dangerous without causing obvious symptoms, so smart devices that can diagnose them could be helpful as a prevention strategy.

IRREGULAR HEART RATE

The most common heartbeat irregularity is called atrial fibrillation, or afib. Afib happens when the two upper chambers of the heart don’t beat in sync with the two lower chambers, and can increase the risk of everything from heart attack to kidney disease to dementia. But it can be hard to detect. New technology has come out to more accurately diagnose Afib and it’s all in the wristband!

 

The KardiaBand by AliveCor is a sensor that is compatible with the Apple Watch and can detect abnormal heart rhythm and atrial fibrillation (AFib). The user touches the sensor, which then takes a reading of the electrical activity of the heart, called an electrocardiogram (EKG) and then sends the information to an app. The AliveCor KardiaBand has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration.

In the past the Fitbits sensor was not as accurate in detecting abnormalities in the heart rate. In October of 2017, Fitbit presented data on an algorithm was developed to detect a atrial fibrillation, using a technology already built into its wristband trackers: photoplethysmography, or PPG. Fitness trackers have long used PPG devices to monitor pulse rates. The tiny sensors, which consist of infrared light-emitting diodes (LEDs) coupled with a sensitive light detector, measure infinitesimal gradations in light in human tissue, due to changing blood volume. This is used as an indicator to detect an irregular heartbeat or Afib.AFib such a good test case for the digital health revolution. It can often be treated cheaply and effectively with oral anticoagulants once it is detected. Discovering someone who has an undiagnosed arrhythmia could save a life! These wearables are well worth the investment! Not to mention they help keep you motivated to move more!

Related Heart Healthy Technology:

     

CEUs for Dental Professionals

Nine Lives CPR is now offering a combination course that includes both CPR and Infection Control for 5 CEUs.

This course is designed to satisfy requirements for license renewal by the SC Board of Dentistry. The course is offered ONSITE and can be customized to fit your needs. We will also be offering it at our partner locations throughout South Carolina. Stay tuned for date announcements.

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As PACE providers, we look forward to bringing the convenience of continuing education to dental offices! Please visit our Dental Professionals page for more details.