World Heart Day!

♥️🌎 World Heart Day is celebrated every year on 9/29. This year we’re asking people around the world to make a promise … for my heart, for your heart, for all our hearts! ♥️ 🌎

A promise as an individual to cook and eat more healthily, to do more exercise and encourage your children to be more active, to say no to smoking and help your loved ones to stop. A promise as a healthcare professional to save more lives. A promise as a politician to implement an NCD action plan.

A simple promise… for MY HEART, for YOUR HEART, for ALL OUR HEARTS.

Cardiovascular disease is the world’s number one killer today. But it doesn’t need to be this way. By making just a few small changes to our lives, we can reduce our risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as improving our quality of life and setting a good example for the next generation. It’s about saying to yourself, the people you care about and individuals all around the world, “what can I do right now to look after MY HEART… and YOUR HEART?”

In May 2012, world leaders committed to reducing global mortality from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 25% by 2025. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is accountable for nearly half of all NCD deaths making it the world’s number one killer. World Heart Day is, therefore, the perfect platform for the CVD community to unite in the fight against CVD and reduce the global disease burden.

World Heart Day is a global campaign during which individuals, families, communities and governments around the world participate in activities to take charge of their heart health and that of others. Through this campaign, the World Heart Federation unites people from all countries and backgrounds in the fight against the CVD burden, and inspires and drives international action to encourage heart-healthy living across the world.

For more info : World heart day

World Heart Federation

Man sees big results by following the federal diet and exercise guidelines for a year

This is a great story by Daniel Green on how he committed to following all of the federal diet and exercise guidelines for one year and saw measurable results in multiple areas of his life. I love the comprehensive approach that he took and how he was able to incorporate everything into his daily routine so that diet and exercise didn’t become a chore.

Most importantly, I’ve finally learned how to live a truly healthy life in a way that suits the rest of my lifestyle. Physical activity and better nutrition are no longer vague notions that I have to figure out how to make time for, but instead are normal parts of my daily routine.

Read the full story here

Emergency & First Aid Kits

How to Choose the Right Kit

We all know that a basic first aid kit can often help a person in need and possibly save a life. However, buying a good first aid kit can be confusing for many people. You can find one in your local grocery store or pharmacy but there’s often only one or two to choose from. There’s an endless supply of first aid kits online but it’s often overwhelming to find the one that has everything you need at the best value. Like many things these days, there is no perfect one size fits all first aid kit. While a basic kit would be a great addition to many homes, some medical offices and businesses may need additional items to keep their employees and customers safe. Let’s take a look at some of the common features in most first aid kits and some items found in the Advanced First Aid Kit.

Basic Kit

All first aid kits should include the following items listed below. While items can be purchased separately, there are a wide variety of kits available that include all of these items in a convenient case. This type of kit is a good option for the home or car.

  • Bandages and gauze dressings to cover wound or support injuries
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Scissors to cut dressings, clothing, rope, seat belts and more
  • Needle-nose tweezers to pull out splinters, ticks, thorns and snake fangs
  • Gloves to protect yourself from blood and other nasty fluids
  • A tourniquet to control blood flow to an injured limb

For a basic kit, I would recommend the 100 Piece First Aid Kit by Preparify.


first aid kit3

Advanced Kit

Advanced First Aid Kits have a wide variety of supplies that will prepare you for many emergencies. Nine Lives CPR highly recommends the Be Smart First Aid kit . This kit has 326 pieces that cover up to 100 people. This Kit can be Mounted to the Wall in a Central Location at the Office. Recommenced use for office, home, car, school, emergency, survival, sports, hunting & camping. Here are some features to look for in an advanced kit:

  • 21 antiseptic towelettes, 36 alcohol prep pads, 6 sting relief pads, 6 antibiotic ointment packets, 6 burn cream ointments, 10 antacid tablets, 10 aspirin tablets, 10 non-aspirin tablets, 1 instant cold compress 6″ x 9″, 1 English First Aid guide, 1 Spanish First Aid guide, 20 adhesive bandages, 1″ x 3″ 50 adhesive bandages 3/8″ x 1-1/2″, 60 adhesive bandages 3″ x 3/4″, 10 butterfly closures bandages, 18 wound closure strips, 1/4″ x 1-1/2″ 2 gauze rolls, 2″ x 4.1 yards, 2 eye pads, 8 sterile gauze pads 2″ x 2″, 4 sterile gauze pads 4″ x 4″, 1 sterile trauma pad 5″ x 9″, 30 cotton tip applicators, 1 adhesive tape roll 1″ x 5 yards, 5 finger splints, 1 triangular bandage 40″ x 40″ x 56″, 1 tweezers, 1 metal scissor, 4 nitrile examination gloves.

For an advanced kit, I would recommend the :  First Aid Kit Hard Red Case 326 Pieces Exceeds OSHA and ANSI Guidelines for 100 People – Office, Home, Car, School, Emergency, Survival, Camping, Hunting, & Sports

Check out the Video to find out why it is the Best Rated!

Let us know in the comments if there are any other features that you look for in a first aid kit or any good deals available.

Apple Watch Heart Study

In November 2017, Apple launched a Heart Study using the Apple Watch’s heart rate sensor to collect data on irregular heart rhythms and notify users who may be experiencing atrial fibrillation

“Every week we receive incredible customer letters about how Apple Watch has affected their lives, including learning that they have AFib. These stories inspire us and we’re determined to do more to help people understand their health,” said Jeff Williams, Apple’s COO. “Working alongside the medical community, not only can we inform people of certain health conditions, we also hope to advance discoveries in heart science.”

Apple is partnering with Stanford Medicine to perform the research. As part of the study, if an irregular heart rhythm is identified, participants will receive a notification on their Apple Watch and iPhone, a free consultation with a study doctor and an electrocardiogram (ECG) patch for additional monitoring. The Apple Heart Study app is available in the US App Store to customers who are 22 years or older and have an Apple Watch Series 1 or later.

For more information, read the press release or check out the app

Woman saves 3 people in 1 year with CPR

Love this story on the Today Show about Madeline Dahl who helped three people in one year using CPR and first aid.

The first time she helped a stranger was last October. After reading an article about an app that alerts users if a person nearby needs CPR, Dahl downloaded it. For months, she received no notifications. But as she was leaving work one Friday, the app started beeping. Someone nearby needed CPR.

 

For the full story, check out http://www.today.com/health/woman-saves-3-people-1-year-doing-cpr-first-aid-t114490

Alexa, how do I do CPR?

Alexa, the friendly voice of the Amazon Echo, will for the first time give all three instructions for CPR, heart attack and stroke warning signs.
The information is crucial because prompt medical attention can make the difference between life or death, or significant disability, said Robert Neumar, M.D., Ph.D., chair of emergency medicine at the University of Michigan Medical School.
“Any system that can reliably reduce delays in medical care for cardiac arrest, heart attack and stroke has the potential to improve health outcomes,” he said.
To access this new information, people simply ask Alexa, starting with the phrase “Alexa, ask American Heart” to ensure they’re hearing the science-based information from the American Heart Association. So, you would say:
— “Alexa, ask American Heart … how do I perform CPR?”
— “Alexa, ask American Heart … what are the warning signs of a heart attack?”
— “Alexa, ask American Heart … what are the warning signs for stroke?”

This is super cool. I bet it will save a lot of lives. For more info, check out:

http://news.heart.org/alexa-can-tell-you-the-steps-for-cpr-warning-signs-of-heart-attack-and-stroke/

History of CPR

1740 The Paris Academy of Sciences officially recommended mouth-to-mouth resuscitation for drowning victims. 

1767 The Society for the Recovery of Drowned Persons became the first organized effort to deal with sudden and unexpected death. 

1891 Dr. Friedrich Maass performed the first equivocally documented chest compression in humans. 

Did you know that CPR started back in the 1700’s? Check out the History of CPR by the American Heart Association

AHA Grant Opportunities

American Heart Association (AHA) is now accepting grant applications specifically for cardiac arrest and resuscitation with deadlines starting July 26, 2016 and running through August 16, 2016. This is a tremendous opportunity to advance research in cardiac arrest and resuscitation. Grants range in amounts from $51,000 to $231,000 and will be awarded in two major science classifications:
Basic Science 

Clinical Science and Population/Health Services

The knowledge that we learn and the skills that we practice in CPR class is not possible without the tremendous effort of many scientists and researchers out there. Head over to the American Hear Association web site to learn more about their cardiac arrest and resuscitation grants.

Nutrition Labels

Exited about the upcoming changes to nutrition labels:

On Friday, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the White House announced final changes to nutrition labels, which will be required on packaged foods within the next two years. The long-awaited changes included a specific call-out for added sugars—sweeteners added to foods, as opposed to those that occur naturally, as in a piece of fruit—a larger font for the total number of calories, and serving sizes that are more in line with the amount of food a person is likely to consume. For instance, a 20 oz soda will now count as one serving, since that is how it is most likely to be consumed.

Check out this article on time.com for a great overview or head over to the FDA’s official page for some serious details.